4 Lessons from Live Streaming for 24 hours

4 Lessons after 24hrs of Live Streaming

Extra Life helps raise money for children's hospitals across the country

Hello and welcome,

So this week we are doing a post-game carnage report of our 24-hour live stream we did this previous weekend to benefit Extra Life. While we consider it a definite success (we raised nearly $1400 for Children’s Hospital New Orleans) and a great collaborative effort with the other participating companies (NOLAnerdcast and Implicted), we still learned a ton from successes and roadblocks a like.

  1. Delegation isn’t enough. You need to be able to trust people to do their job and then let it go. There are a ton of moving pieces when prepping do A) live stream for such a long duration, B) coordinate several participants, C) coordinate all donations, social media, and sponsors. I would often get caught up in the sponsorship side instead of just trusting NOLAnerdcast’s Matt Finneman to do what he set out to do. All it amounted to was wasted time on my end – he performed incredibly well and secured us around a dozen sponsors, way more than we ever anticipated.
  2. Test, test, and test some more. We ran through Screen Shot 2015-11-11 at 3.58.21 PMextensive tests of the televisions, game consoles, twitch account, broadcast speeds, and more. Hours and hours of prep and test and we still ran into roadblocks (some avoidable, some not). If we had not spent a ton of time testing everything the evening would have been a disaster. No matter how well you know your equipment, test it all ahead of time over and over again and make sure you have any parts/info you need to troubleshoot when the inevitable snags arise.
  3. Personalities matter. This again goes back to the nerdcast team. They have experience being goofy, opinionated, messing with each other, and more. They were a fantastic on-screen presence and it was our job (inDEPTH and Implicted) to facilitate that. We always made sure to have at least one person in front of the camera either “actively” playing (i.e. screaming at people and making fun of their teammates), providing entertaining commentary, or overall just talking to the audience. People want to see the video games, but at the end of the day a live-stream is watched because of the people in front of the camera.
  4. Screen Shot 2015-11-09 at 1.36.54 PM (3)Know your audience. Seems simple enough, but this is exponentially more important when collaborating. NOLAnerdcast draws on a demographic that we do not usually pull – we needed to adjust our thinking, wording, hashtags, what have you, in order to maximize that exposure. Each group can’t be solely responsible for mobilizing their audience, each collaborator needs to work together to compliment the other’s efforts. Matt and I discussed which game launches to build off of (Halo 5 was a big one), which tech specs to trumpet to video and streaming folks, what jokes hit which groups, and more. By the end of the 24 hours inDEPTH Media had dozens of new followers on Twitter, Facebook, and other platforms. Awesome, right?

Thanks for reading this wall of text! Hit us up @inDEPTHmedia on twitter and instagram and let us know your thoughts!

Cheers,

inDEPTH

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